Parenting

Income that PAYS Your Child Support WITHOUT Increasing Your Child Support


Child support is defined as that part of your income you would spend on your children if they lived with you. Custodial parents do not pay child support, because it is assumed that they are spending money on the children, either directly (clothes, entertainment, etc.) and indirectly (rent, food, etc.). Non-custodial parents are ordered to pay child support -usually a fixed amount for a certain period of time, like per week or per month - to the custodial parent, who is required to spend it for the benefit of the child. This article is written to define a method by which a non-custodial parent can create income that should pay his or her child support obligation, yet not increase the child support obligation.

Two models exist for determining child support. The first, and probably the most prevalent, is the "dual income" model - the incomes of the custodial and non-custodial parents are combined, a child support amount is calculated from the combined incomes, and then each parent's portion is determined. The non-custodial parent is ordered to pay his or her portion as child support.

The second and the more straightforward and direct, is the "single income" model. The non-custodial parent is ordered to pay a fixed percentage of his income (either gross or net), regardless of the income of the custodial parent.

Child support is fixed in a court order, usually after a hearing that determines the income and the portion that will be child support. Incidental increases or decreases in income, like cost of living raises or a random bonus, should not and usually do not change the child support amount. Most states require a certain period of time (2 years, for example) before an increase or decrease in child support can be sought, unless the change in the child support would be a certain amount - 20% up or down, for example.

A second income stream that does not cause an increase in child support, or only a slight increase, can be used to pay your child support, without affecting your main source of income. For example, using the "single income" model and 20% for the child support multiplier, if your income (for child support purposes) is $2000, your child support is $400. Say that you create a second income of $500. Your total income is $2500, which means your child support would be $500. However, this is exactly the amount of your increase, so you can put your ENTIRE original income in your pocket AND STILL pay $100 more in child support! Oh - the second income doesn't come in to play until the Court considers it and orders it. Since web-based incomes are NOT guaranteed to be steady, there's a chance your support won't go up - in which case, your web-income could cover ALL your child support AND put money in your pocket!

You can get this second income in several ways. Taking a second job is one way, but that may take time away from your kids and your family. Ebay is another, but that may not be steady enough to support the increase every month.

Another way is to set up a website that brings in a small but steady income each month. There are many methods to do this.

One example is SFI. An example website at http://www.moreinfo247.com/9011602 (cut and paste into your browser if link doesn't work) shows a website that can generate income from selling products, as well as an Affiliate link which would provide a passive second income. There are many such websites available; however, be aware that investing money into a web-based business may not be deductible for child supprt purposes. A system that requires little or no money investment to generate a second income is the least risky.

These programs may be able to generate income each month sufficient to cover your child support without raising it significantly. The end result is more money in your pocket from your job, and at the same time, more money for your kids.

Erik Carter is an experienced family law litigator who has represented hundreds of fathers in courts in Indiana and Illinois. He has written AGGRESSIVE PLEADINGS FOR THE NON-CUSTODIAL FATHER (http://dadspleadings.easystorecreator.net) and SIX TEMPTATIONS OF JESUS CHRIST (http://knowledge-download.com/Six_Temptations)


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