Parenting

Psychological Effects of Child Abuse


Many children who suffer from the psychological effects of child abuse often become child abusers themselves or can become perpetrators of violent crimes. Many inmates in our jails and prisons have been victims of child abuse. Though the psychological effects of child abuse cannot be reversed, through counseling a child can learn more appropriate coping skills in dealing with their pain and anger.

Some psychological effects of child abuse are:

* Withdrawal from friends
* Low self esteem
* Timid and unsure of themselves
* Aggressive/hostile
* Angry
* Poor relationships with peers and/or the opposite sex
* Engaging in drugs and/or alcohol
* Poor school performance
* No interests
* No goals

Minimize the psychological effects of child abuse with therapy

In order to help a child who is suffering from the psychological effects of child abuse therapy is a great place to start. A therapist will assist a child in dealing with the psychological effects of child abuse to hopefully break the cycle of abuse.

Eliminate the psychological effects of child abuse by seeking help

If you, or your partner, are abusing your child seek help immediately. If your partner is the abuser you should consider moving you and your child to a safe and supportive environment. If you and your partner are the abusers, to prevent further damaging psychological effects of child abuse, you might want to consider having your child stay with a family member or close friend while you get the help and support you need.

Psychological Effects Of Child Abuse Resources

* Anger management classes
* Parenting classes
* Therapy and drug / alcohol treatment (if necessary)

Prevent The Psychological Effects Of Child Abuse

If you are a new parent who has suffered the psychological effects of child abuse as a child, you might want to seek out parenting classes. Parenting classes will enable you to learn appropriate tools and techniques to minimize the psychological effects of child abuse when parenting your child. It is also important for you to take care of yourself and know your limits. Work on building a healthy support network that you could rely on when life is overwhelming you. It is up to you to break the cycle of abuse and not allow your child to experience any of the psychological effects of child abuse. You will be thankful that you did.

Lisa Dunning is a California Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Specializing in Parent/Child Relationship issues and author of "Good Parents Bad Parenting: How To Parent Together When Your Parenting Styles Are Worlds Apart".

Lisa Dunning is a columnist for Las Vegas Family Magazine & Los Angeles Family Magazine and provides expert relationship and parenting advice for television and radio programs throughout the country.

To learn more about Lisa Dunning, her parenting book and other services, visit her website at http://www.LisaDunningMFT.com


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